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National Women's History Month

National Women's History Month

The month of March is known for many things, like St. Patrick’s Day, spring break and even its unpredictable weather. However, one aspect of March which can often get overlooked is National Women’s History Month. Since 1987, the United States has honored Women’s History Month by recognizing the unique and significant contributions various women have made to society throughout history.

So, how exactly did National Women’s History Month get started, and how can you altruistically celebrate it? Today we dive into the history behind this month and how you can get involved, give back and build a better world by celebrating National Women’s History Month.

The History Behind the Month
One of the most important ways you can give back with National Women’s History Month is by learning more about the history behind the month. The famous month actually originated as just a week. It started out in 1978 as a weeklong celebration organized by the school district of Sonoma, California, recognizing women’s contributions to culture, history and society. Students in the district gave presentations at dozens of school, participated in a “Real Woman” essay contest and even held a parade in downtown Santa Rosa.

Years later, other communities, school districts and organizations around the country started to catch onto the idea of a women’s celebration. Then, in 1980, President Jimmy Carter declared the week of March 8th as National Women’s History Week. The following year, the U.S. Congress continued the decree by passing a resolution that established a national celebration. Six years later in 1987, the National Women’s History Project petitioned Congress to expand the event to the entire month of March. They succeeded, and thus National Women’s History Month was born.

International Women’s Day
Part of the origin behind women’s history week and month began with International Women’s Day. International Women’s Day took place for the first time on March 8, 1911, as a global celebration of the economic, political and social achievements of women. Countries around the world celebrated—and continue to celebrate—the day with demonstrations, educational initiatives and cultural customs. The United Nations itself has sponsored the global event since 1975. The weeklong celebration of Sonoma, California, originated because of International Women’s Day, ultimately contributing to the foundation of National Women’s History Month.

When the U.N. adopted its resolution on the observance of International Women’s Day, they cited the following reasons: “To recognize that securing peace and social progress and the full enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms require the active participation, equality and development of women; and to acknowledge the contribution of women to the strengthening of international peace and security.”

Get Involved with a Women’s Organization
So, how can you live altruistically and celebrate National Women’s History Month? By getting involved with a women’s organization, of course. Take time to recognize the meaningful contributions women have made to society throughout generations. Learn more about female inventors, artists and politicians. Look in your community for women’s organizations you can get involved with, then see how you can volunteer or donate to give back. Support the women in your friend group, family and neighborhood to help recognize women throughout the community, society and history.

This March, celebrate National Women’s History Month by learning more and giving back. See how you can get involved, live altruistically and make a difference in the lives of girls and women around you.

Our Impact in 2017

January 1-December 31
  • CAPSA is a non-profit domestic violence, sexual abuse, and rape recovery center serving Cache County and the Bear Lake area.

  • YCC Family Crisis Center is a domestic violence shelter and rape crisis center provide services 24/7 to victims and their children.

  • Utah Legal Services (ULS) is a nonprofit law office incorporated in 1976 committed to making equal justice a reality by providing free legal help in non-criminal cases to low-income Utahns.

  • South Valley Services is a domestic violence service provider in West Jordan, Utah. We provide safe shelter and supportive services to women, men and their children who have been impacted by domestic violence.

  • Today, the YWCA is Utah’s most comprehensive provider of family violence services; our programs include walk-in services and a crisis line, emergency shelter, transitional housing, children’s programs, and a vast array of supportive services.

  • Established in 1990, Seekhaven assists survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault rebuild their lives. Serving Grand County and Southeastern Utah, Seekhaven provides a wide range of essential services including client advocacy, emergency shelter, and transition assistance.

  • Peace House is dedicated to ending family violence and abuse through education, outreach, support services, and safe housing.

  • New Hope Crisis Center has been serving Box Elder County for 30 years. Our mission is to provide all-inclusive, integrated, victim-centered services to stabilize and support individuals, families, and our community.

  • Founded in 1984, The Center for Women and Children in Crisis has been in continuous operation for 33 years. Our mission is to provide a caring, advocating, safe, and educationally based environment for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

  • Our organization advocates for victims of domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, and the homeless. Serving people in Sevier, Piute, Millard, Sanpete and Wayne counties of Utah.

  • The DOVE Center is the only area agency providing safe-shelter, crisis intervention, and prevention for clients who have been victimized by violence in their home – whether by a family member or cohabitant – that also serves victims of rape and sexual assault.

  • Founded in 1922, Legal Aid Society of Salt Lake is a non-profit organization that promotes safety, stability and self-sufficiency for low income families and individuals, as well as victims of domestic violence, through effective, efficient legal advocacy and assistance.

  • Canyon Creek Services provides free and confidential services for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in Iron, Beaver and Garfield Counties.

  • Valley Behavioral Health is a nonprofit network of clinics providing treatment for behavioral conditions, addictions, psychiatric conditions, autism and other chronic health conditions. We treat chronic lifelong conditions as well as temporary conditions triggered by traumatic life events. Our programs are tailored to people of all ages and every social, cultural and economic situation.

  • Preserve the heritage. Enhance the wellbeing. Strengthen the future of the People.

  • Our Mission: To bring hope, justice, and healing to victims of domestic violence murder by providing holistic non-profit legal representation in the civil, probate and family courts.

  • At Amethyst Center for Healing we are dedicated to helping individuals, families, and communities recover from trauma and abuse, so that we may all live peaceful, empowered lives.

© 2018 Utah Domestic Violence Coalition

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