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Support National Foster Care Month

Support National Foster Care Month

The month of May is known for many things: the end of the school year, the season of spring and of course, the smell of fresh flowers. But did you know May is also home to National Foster Care Month? National Foster Care Month first began in 1988, when President Reagan issued a proclamation announcing May as the month of recognition. Since then, it has continued to be recognized and celebrated by agencies, families and individuals throughout the country. 

According to Child Welfare Information Gateway, National Foster Care Month was created as “...a time to acknowledge foster parents, family members, volunteers, mentors, policymakers, child welfare professionals, and other members of the community who help children and youth in foster care find permanent homes and connections.” With more than 440,000 youth in foster care, there are plenty of ways to make a difference during this month. Here are ideas for how to support National Foster Care Month.

Share the news.
One easy way to assist with National Foster Care Month is through social media. Share the news by posting updates, information and facts across social networking pages. Many people are uninformed about the foster care system and the youth within it, so this is a great opportunity to educate. Take to your social media pages and see how you can get people involved to make a difference.

Become a mentor.
No matter who they are, children simply need one adult in their lives who is a constant, comforting presence—who they know believes in them and will be there for them. You could be that adult for a youth in the foster care system. Check to see what programs are available to mentor a foster youth in your area. Then, get together with a child and play games, teach life skills and show how much you care.

Support during aging out.
Depending on the state, children age out of the foster care system between ages 18 and 21. According to the National Foster Youth Institute, only 50% of foster kids who age out of the system will have a form of gainful employment by the age of 24. There is less than a 3% chance for former foster youth to earn a college degree at any point in their life. You can help beat these odds by working with children who age out of the system through local programs that teach college and career counseling, or train on valuable life skills.

Encourage foster parents.
Fostering a youth in your home can be incredibly challenging. Not only is it difficult on the child, but it’s also hard on the parents and potentially other children in the house. If you know someone who has opened their home to foster children, be a voice of encouragement and comfort for them. Let them know that they make a difference in these children’s lives. Who knows? You might even consider becoming a foster parent yourself someday.

Donate to an organization.
Finally, search for organizations in your community or nationally who support children in foster care. While volunteering always helps, if you have the opportunity, consider donating financially, as well. Your contributions can provide valuable programs for these children that encourage their emotional, mental and physical wellbeing—helping throughout their childhood and enabling them to become healthy adults. Search to see how you can donate to make an impact.

May is National Foster Care Month, which means it’s the perfect time to get involved with foster care youth in your area. Keep these ideas in mind as ways to benefit the children, parents, families and workers within the foster care system, and live a more altruistic lifestyle.

Our Impact in 2018

January 1-December 31
  • CAPSA is a non-profit domestic violence, sexual abuse, and rape recovery center serving Cache County and the Bear Lake area.

  • YCC Family Crisis Center is a domestic violence shelter and rape crisis center provide services 24/7 to victims and their children.

  • Utah Legal Services (ULS) is a nonprofit law office incorporated in 1976 committed to making equal justice a reality by providing free legal help in non-criminal cases to low-income Utahns.

  • South Valley Services is a domestic violence service provider in West Jordan, Utah. We provide safe shelter and supportive services to women, men and their children who have been impacted by domestic violence.

  • Today, the YWCA is Utah’s most comprehensive provider of family violence services; our programs include walk-in services and a crisis line, emergency shelter, transitional housing, children’s programs, and a vast array of supportive services.

  • Established in 1990, Seekhaven assists survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault rebuild their lives. Serving Grand County and Southeastern Utah, Seekhaven provides a wide range of essential services including client advocacy, emergency shelter, and transition assistance.

  • Peace House is dedicated to ending family violence and abuse through education, outreach, support services, and safe housing.

  • New Hope Crisis Center has been serving Box Elder County for 30 years. Our mission is to provide all-inclusive, integrated, victim-centered services to stabilize and support individuals, families, and our community.

  • Founded in 1984, The Center for Women and Children in Crisis has been in continuous operation for 33 years. Our mission is to provide a caring, advocating, safe, and educationally based environment for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

  • Our organization advocates for victims of domestic violence, rape and sexual assault, and the homeless. Serving people in Sevier, Piute, Millard, Sanpete and Wayne counties of Utah.

  • The DOVE Center is the only area agency providing safe-shelter, crisis intervention, and prevention for clients who have been victimized by violence in their home – whether by a family member or cohabitant – that also serves victims of rape and sexual assault.

  • Founded in 1922, Legal Aid Society of Salt Lake is a non-profit organization that promotes safety, stability and self-sufficiency for low income families and individuals, as well as victims of domestic violence, through effective, efficient legal advocacy and assistance.

  • Canyon Creek Services provides free and confidential services for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in Iron, Beaver and Garfield Counties.

  • Valley Behavioral Health is a nonprofit network of clinics providing treatment for behavioral conditions, addictions, psychiatric conditions, autism and other chronic health conditions. We treat chronic lifelong conditions as well as temporary conditions triggered by traumatic life events. Our programs are tailored to people of all ages and every social, cultural and economic situation.

  • Preserve the heritage. Enhance the wellbeing. Strengthen the future of the People.

  • Our Mission: To bring hope, justice, and healing to victims of domestic violence murder by providing holistic non-profit legal representation in the civil, probate and family courts.

  • At Amethyst Center for Healing we are dedicated to helping individuals, families, and communities recover from trauma and abuse, so that we may all live peaceful, empowered lives.

  • Safe Harbor, a non-profit organization, provides shelter, supportive services and advocacy to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as education, awareness and resources to our community.

© 2019 Utah Domestic Violence Coalition

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